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Hitting the right note: Plants and their relationship with music

Hitting the right note: Plants and their relationship with music


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The same case applies to music, plants show their predilection for certain genres -although they also need moments of silence- and there are directly melodies that hurt them, even causing death.

One of the first experiments on plants and their relationship with music was carried out in 1973, promoted by researcher Dorothy Retallack, from the University of Denver.

Different situations were monitored in two cameras: one group of plants were made to listen to rock music for three hours a day, while in another camera, the radio was set to soft music for three hours a day.

Plants exposed to soft music grew healthily and their stems began to bend towards the radio ...

Plants exposed to soft music grew healthy and their stems began to bend towards the radio. However, the plants that heard rock, had small leaves and drifted away from the apparatus, grew ungainly, and most died within 16 days.

The researcher went on to experiment with a variety of styles of music. The plants leaned away from Led Zeppelin and Jimi Hendrix, but they seemed to appreciate Bach's jazz and organ music.

Similarly, the plants studied gave hints that their favorite melody was North Indian classical music played on a zither and showed complete indifference to country music.

The researcher also discovered that different types of sounds help plants to grow faster. Retallack also studied the effects of different shades growing up. He finally found that by playing a continuous tone for eight hours, the plant died within two weeks, but that playing with the same intermittent tone for three hours a day helped the plants grow faster than those without sound contact.

Mozart Effect: Plants and Classical Music

There are people who argue that putting classical music to plants can increase their growth. This is what is called the Mozart Effect.

The Japanese company Pioneer did some research regarding the influence of vibrations on the growth of vegetables. Thus, on a farm, these were subjected to acoustic treatment.

They placed electrodes on the leaves of tomatoes and lettuce and these drew their reactions to a Chopin polonaise on the electro paper ...

Placed in glass cabinets, they placed electrodes on the leaves of tomatoes and lettuce and these drew on the electro paper their reactions to a Chopin polonaise, a Brahms, Mozart, or Beethoven concerto.

They were made to listen to classical music for several hours a day and their roots were influenced by the magnetic layers created by magnets located in the water circuits. The result was that these vegetables grew faster.

Music in the vineyard fields

In 2001, researching an eco-friendly way to keep pests out of his vineyards, music lover Carlo Cignozzi used loudspeakers throughout his 10,000-acre Tuscan vineyard known as Il Paradiso di Frassina.

They played a selection of classical music to the vineyards 24 hours a day - including Mozart - and noticed that these seemed to mature faster ...

They played a selection of classical music - including Mozart - to the vineyards 24 hours a day and noticed that these seemed to mature faster. Cignozzi said those closest to the speakers matured faster and insisted on playing classical music, rather than pop or rock.

In 2006, a research team from the University of Florence expanded the research. According to agriculture professor Stefano Mancuso, due to the sound, the vineyards matured faster than those not exposed to music. This also had positive effects on the growth of the vine and the total area of ​​leaves per vineyard.

Music is present in nature and practically everything has its sounds, causing the most diverse effects on living beings.

In the same way, although some may not believe it, plants are living beings that also suffer and enjoy. Music is good therapy for them, as it is for humans.

Many experts conducted studies to measure the effects of stimulating music on animals, but not so much around plants, since some are skeptical about it and consider that plants lack auditory organs and nervous system. Although we nature lovers, beyond all scientific evidence, know that this is not the case.

Worms


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